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Horse racing betting

It is the sport of a jockey and the horses that travel a certain distance and try to reach the finish line first. The jockey can sit on a seat in the back of his horse back or on a cart with two wheels attached to a horse that drags that are called, respectively, trot and gallop.
The races may be of speed and skill. In that skill along with the jockey has to make his horse quickly and without errors, the correct path and then have a jury by a vote. The racetrack is where competitions are held for turf. Since the horse racing is a sport which involves many competitors over time has become a source of betting.
Horse racing is an equestrian sport that has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times are an early example, as is the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. It is often inextricably associated with gambling. The common sobriquet for Thoroughbred horse racing is The Sport of Kings.
One of the principal forms of horse racing, which is popular in many parts of the world, is Thoroughbred racing. Harness racing is also popular in Australia, New Zealand, the eastern United States and more popular than Thoroughbred racing in Canada and parts of Europe. Quarter horse racing is also popular in the western United States and Florida. Racing with purebred Arabian horses exists in several states in the United States, as well as in most of Europe and the Middle East.
The breeding, training and racing of horses in many countries is now a significant economic activity as, to a greater extent, is the gambling industry which is largely supported by it. Exceptional horses can win millions of dollars and might make millions more by providing stud services, such as horse breeding.
American betting on horse racing is sanctioned and regulated by the state the racetrack is located in. Simulcast betting almost always exist across state lines with no oversight except the companies involved through legalized parimutuel gambling. A takeout, or "take", is removed from each betting pool and distributed according to state law, among the state, race track and horsemen. On average, 17 percent is withheld from win, place and show pools, with 83 percent being returned to the winning players.

We now have two disciplines that relate to the turf that are: flat racing (trot and gallop) and ran to barriers or hedges.

The gait of the horse in trot is normal to the support of the feet is simultaneous transverse (left rear with the front right and rear right to front left).
In this discipline the horse should not use the neck for balance and keep in balance the movement of weight as in race pace fast gallop.
When it comes to horse racing and understood the trot that takes place in a race on dirt and sand along a kilometer where the horse traina a Sulky two wheels (the truck to a post on two wheels) on which sit the jockey called precisely driver (jockey). In this discipline the horse is able to move at a speed of 10 km/h up to 55 km/h. The trotting races are held on a track with the sandy bottom of the length of 800 or 1000 meters. The pace that makes the horse is special and is called the trot where is attacked a truck that is called Sulky two wheels on which the jockey sits and which is specifically named as the driver (jockey). If the horse changes his pace with that of the gallop is automatically disqualified. The race kicks off with all participants online and start making it a machine that lies ahead and where the runners in the rear is a fixed grid. The machine takes speed to start the race from the point of departure out of the track. The winner is the one who with the muzzle over the goal line.
The trot is a two-beat gait that has a wide variation in possible speeds, but averages about 8 mph (13 km/h), or, very roughly, about the same speed as a healthy adult human can run. A very slow trot is sometimes referred to as a jog. An extremely fast trot has no special name, but in harness racing, the trot of a Standardbred is faster than the gallop of the average non-racehorse.
In this gait, the horse moves its legs in unison in diagonal pairs. From the standpoint of the balance of the horse, this is a very stable gait, and the horse need not make major balancing motions with its head and neck.
The trot is the working gait for a horse. Despite what one sees in movies, horses can only canter and gallop for short periods at a time, after which they need time to rest and recover. Horses in good condition can maintain a working trot for hours. The trot is the main way horses travel quickly from one place to the next.
Depending on the horse and its speed, a trot can be difficult for a rider to sit because the body of the horse actually drops a bit between beats and bounces up again when the next set of legs strike the ground. Each time another diagonal pair of legs hits the ground, the rider can be jolted upwards out of the saddle and meet the horse with some force on the way back down. Therefore, at most speeds above a jog, especially in English riding disciplines, most riders post to the trot, rising up and down in rhythm with the horse to avoid being jolted. Posting is easy on the horse's back, and once mastered is also easy on the rider.
To not be jostled out of the saddle and to not harm the horse by bouncing on its back, riders must learn specific skills in order to sit the trot. Most riders can easily learn to sit a slow jog trot without bouncing. A skilled rider can ride even a powerfully extended trot without bouncing, but to do so requires well-conditioned back and stomach muscles, and to do so for long periods is tiring for even experienced riders. A fast, uncollected, racing trot, such as that of the harness racing horse, is virtually impossible to sit.
Because the trot is such a safe and efficient gait for a horse, learning to ride the trot correctly is an important component in almost all equestrian disciplines. Nonetheless, "gaited" or "ambling" horses that possess smooth 4-beat intermediate gaits that replace or supplement the trot (see "ambling gaits" below), are popular with riders who prefer for various reasons not to have to ride at a trot.
In 1892, Leland Stanford settled an argument about whether trotting horses were ever fully airborne: he paid photographer Eadweard Muybridge to prove it photographically. The resulting photo, the first documented example of high-speed photography, clearly showed the horse airborne.
Two variations of the trot are specially trained in advanced dressage horses: the Piaffe and the Passage. The Piaffe is essentially created by asking the horse to trot in place, with very little forward motion. The Passage (rhymes with "massage") is an exaggerated slow motion trot. Both require tremendous collection, careful training and considerable physical conditioning for a horse to perform.

The pace of the gallop is performed in three very fast where the horse moves the legs first then the basin and finally the front legs. A second limb of which puts on the floor last one says gallop right or left gallop. The horse galloped into the bar diagonally split in two so that no more than three times but becomes four.
Another specialty of horse racing track is the gallop to the jockey riding the horse. The race takes place on land that may be of grass or sand the length ranging from 800 to 4000 meters. Typically, riders are low stature (150-160 m) and very light (52 kg). The races that are made to gallop are of two kinds: the horses of the same age and horses sansa age limit. There are another category to which they are divided in races with horses of the same weight, great prizes, packed racing, horse racing with different values, with a handicap, with the addition of weights to have the same weight in order to put all the participants in give the opportunity to be able to win all. The horse to take part in a race plan must have at least 2 years. Participants are deployed in line inside a cage and all the waiting on. The winner is the one with the muzzle that extends beyond the goal line. There are also other types of races under the name of obstacle races where participants must jump hedges or obstacles in our path and who wins is the most skillful. The speed of this discipline varies from 20 you have 70 km / h (running on stage).
The horses involved are all descendants of three thoroughbred stallions Arabs in the seventeenth century were imported into England and then made to couple with fifty selected mares trot in hand have been coupled with the thoroughbred mare from a trot.
The gallop is very much like the canter, except that it is faster, more ground-covering, and the three-beat canter changes to a four-beat gait. It is the fastest gait of the horse, averaging about 25 to 30 miles per hour (40 to 50 km/h), and in the wild is used when the animal needs to flee from predators or simply cover short distances quickly. Horses seldom will gallop more than a mile or two before they need to rest, though horses can sustain a moderately-paced gallop for longer distances before they become winded and have to slow down.
The gallop is also the gait of the classic race horse. Modern Thoroughbred horse races are seldom longer than a mile and a half, though in some countries Arabian horses are sometimes raced as far as two and a half miles. The fastest galloping speed is achieved by the American quarter horse, which in a short sprint of a quarter mile or less has been clocked at speeds approaching 55 mph (88 km/h).
Like a canter, the horse will strike off with its non-leading hind foot; but the second stage of the canter becomes, in the gallop, the second and third stages because the inside hind foot hits the ground a split second before the outside front foot. Then both gaits end with the striking off of the leading leg, followed by a moment of suspension when all four feet are off the ground. A careful listener or observer can tell an extended canter from a gallop by the presence of the fourth beat.
Contrary to the old "classic" paintings of running horses, which showed all four legs stretched out in the suspension phase, when the legs are stretched out, at least one foot is still in contact with the ground. When all four feet are off the ground in the suspension phase of the gallop, the legs are bent rather than extended.
According to Equix, who analyzed the biometrics of racing thoroughbreds, the average racing colt has a stride length of 24.6 feet; that of Secretariat, for instance, was 24.8 feet, which was probably part of his success.
A controlled gallop used to show a horse's ground-covering stride in horse show competition is called a "gallop in hand" or a hand gallop.
Note that when a horse jumps over a fence, the legs are stretched out while in the air, and the front legs hit the ground before the hind legs, which is completely different from the suspended phase of a gallop. Essentially, the horse takes the first two steps of a galloping stride on the take-off side of the fence, and the other two steps on the landing side. A horse has to collect its hindquarters after a jump to strike off into the next stride.

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